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Lower Saxony

 

Contents

today's Flags

historical and regional Flags

Meaning/Origin of the Flag

Coat of Arms

Meaning/Origin of the Coat of Arms

Map

Numbers and Facts

History



today's Flags

Landesflagge, Landesdienstflagge, Flagge, Fahne, flag, Niedersachsen, Lower Saxony
Flag of the country,
ratio = 3:5,
Source, by: Corel Draw 4




Landesdienstflagge, Schiffe, Boote, Flagge, Fahne, flag, Niedersachsen, Lower Saxony
Official flag for vessels and boats,
ratio = 3:5


Flagge, Fahne, flag, Ministerpräsident, Premier, Niedersachsen, Lower Saxony
Flag of the Premier

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historical and regional Flags

Flagge, Fahne, flag, Provinz Hannover, Province of Hanover
1873–1946,
Flag of the Prussian Province of Hanover,
ratio = 3:5,
Source, by: Flags of the World




Landesflagge, Landesdienstflagge, Flagge, Fahne, flag, Freistaat Hannover, free state of Hanover
23.08.1946–01.11.1946,
Flag of the State of Hanover,
ratio = 3:5,
Source, by: Königreich Hannover




Landesflagge, Flagge, Fahne, flag, Niedersachsen, Lower Saxony
01.11.1946–1951,
Flag of the Country of Lower Saxony,
ratio = 3:5,
Source, by: Königreich Hannover




Flagge, Fahne, flag, Niedersachsen, Lower Saxony, Hannover, Hanover
since 1952,
Flag of the former Hanoverian territories within the German federal country of Lower Saxony,
ratio = 3:5,
Source, by: Königreich Hannover




Flagge, Fahne, flag, Niedersachsen, Lower Saxony, Oldenburg
Flag of the former country Oldenburg,
ratio = 3:5




Flagge, Fahne, flag, Niedersachsen, Braunschweig, Brunswick
Flag of the former country Brunswick,
ratio = 3:5




Flagge, Fahne, flag, Niedersachsen, Lower Saxony, Schaumburg-Lippe
Flag of the former country Schaumburg-Lippe,
ratio = 3:5



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Meaning/Origin of the Flag

The flag of Lower Saxony was officially confirmed on 3rd of April in 1951 by the parliament of Lower Saxony. It shows the colours black-red-gold with the coat of arms of the country. The coat of arms is a semicircular shield with a skipping white horse in the red field. Since 1952 the former flags of the in Lower Saxony joined four former states of Hanover, Brunswick, Oldenburg and Schaumburg-Lippe savor recognition by the state as regional traditional flags. But in the area of Hanover in use in this context the flag of the former Prussian Province of Hannover and not the flag of the only a few month in the year 1946 existing Staate of Hanover. The flag of the premier – a car's standard in a size of 30x30 cm – was like all official flags officially abolished by law on 29th of January in 2002 (Nds. MBl. S. 72), but it is unofficial furthermore in use for very infrequent diplomatic purpose (e.g. state visits). The official flag for vessels and boats has its roots in the Flag Right Law (BGBl. I 1994, S. 3140) of the Federation. It marks the in public service of the Country of Lower Saxony operating sea ships and ships for inland waters.

Source: Ausführungsbestimmungen zum Niedersächsischen Wappengesetz, Niedersächsisches Wappengesetz, Die Welt der Flaggen, protokoll-inland.de, Volker Preuß

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Coat of Arms


Wappen coat of arms Niedersachsen Lower Saxony
Coat of arms of Lower Saxony,
Source, by: Corel Draw 4


Wappen coat of arms Niedersachsen-Zeichen Logo Niedersachsen Lower Saxony Sign

Lower Saxony Sign,
Source, by: www.niedersachsen.de

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Meaning/Origin of the Coat of Arms

The white horse in the coat of arms is the "Saxons Ross". It has its roots in the Tribal-Duchy of Saxony and was later adoped from the Welfen-Dynasty. Their symbol was actually a golden lion on red ground. In this way became it the heraldic animal of the Kingdom of Hannover (since 1866 Prussian Province of Hannover), of the Prussian Province of Westfalia and since 1922 of the Country of Brunswick. This tradition is continued in the FRG at those federal countries to which formerly Welfian territories belong. In this way they have until today the white horse in their coats of arms: Lower Saxony and North-Rhine Westfalia.

In old reproductions of coats of arms (at least until 1935) the Saxons Ross held its tail always upward. With the new-creation of the State of Hanover was that tradition broken after the Second World War, because the Saxons Ross held on its flag its tail downwards. That was continued in the Country of Lower Saxony – the successor of the State of Hanover. Because of that the Saxons Ross is called in Westfalia (wehre it holds the tail still upward) "Westfalia Horse", in contrast to the "Lower Saxony Horse".

Source: Die Welt der Flaggen, Volker Preuß

"According to the Lower Saxony Coat of Arms Act, the coat of arms and the heraldic animal may only be used as a emblem by the authorities of the country. Use by third parties is prohibited. The so-called "Lower Saxony Sign" is available for all uses outside the state's administration. It is designed as a picture-word mark and consists of a white horse running in a red oval with the word "Niedersachsen" to the right. The sign is protected by trademark law." ¹

Source: ¹ www.niedersachsen.de

"... The "Lower Saxony Sign" is basically distributed - especially in the social, cultural and economic sphere - to all associations, associations, companies and private individuals who want to visually express their attachment to the state of Lower Saxony, available for free use. The decision on the use in individual cases is given by the Lower Saxony State Chancellery. Prerequisite is the conclusion of a user agreement. ²

Source: ² www.niedersachsen.de

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Map

FRG and its countries, clickable map:

Source: Freeware, University of Texas Libraries, modyfied by: Volker Preuß

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Numbers and Facts

Area: 18.391 square miles

Inhabitants: 7 922 000 (2012)

Density of Population: 431 inh./sq.mi.

Capital: Hanover, 526 000 inh.

Source: Wikipedia (D)

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History

The country Lower Saxony was formed on 1st of Nov. in 1946 by initiative of the allies from the Prussian Province of Hanover and the countries Brunswick, Oldenburg and Schaumburg-Lippe.

Source: Wikipedia (D)

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Kindly supported by: A. Kortmann (D), Peter Tönnies (D), Klaus Georges (D)